My Story
How my experience shaped my thinking

When I was young I wanted to be super rich. I grew up in India in a fairly affluent family, and I was entrepreneurial through my teens. At age 11, I traded snacks in boarding school (by hoarding them and offering them to others days before we got our next quota). Making money came easily to me and over the years it helped me understand the impact entrepreneurs make to society, and also the flaws in the system. But I saw a lot of poverty. It was everywhere. The worst at traffic lights where you could see the desperation and the physical deformation used to extract money. I couldn’t ignore it and often wondered why, as most others did so easily… but it would take me three decades to be able to do something about it.
From bean counting to startups

My career trajectory shaped my global outlook. I moved halfway around the world from India to Trinidad and Tobago when I was 22. The first five years of my working life were spent as a bean counter for Ernst & Young before I started my entrepreneurial journey. Over a ten year period, I co-founded and exited three startups, one of which eventually sold to Twitter. And I helped set up DFS Lab to support startups in emerging markets. I've mentored more than 20 startups, including Nala, Nobuntu, Numi, Pezesha, Pula, TaniHub and Teller.
Raising our consciousness

At age 13, my mother introduced me to meditation. Over the past 30 years, I have slowly increased my consciousness – moving away from narrow-minded self interest and wanting to be filthy rich - to a desire to help humanity. I left a career in investment banking along the way to work in International development. This desire has grown stronger and stronger along with a simple belief that we can make a difference. But, despite spending the last decade trying to improve the lives of the poor by my work in financial inclusion, the progress the entire international development sector has made is very little. I experienced this realisation during the pandemic. While 500 million more people have access to bank accounts in the last decade (albeit mostly empty ones), the economics haven’t changed. As a result, more than half the world’s population continues to be left behind. The feudal system still lives with us today. And we can feel its effects through injustice, inequality and extreme poverty.
Yet, I strongly believe change is possible and we can create a world where everyone thrives. Albert Einstein said, "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them." Which is why we need to raise the collective consciousness of everyone on the planet. One person at a time. Join me on this journey and increase your consciousness, and of those around you. Together we can create a world that’s worth living in and be good ancestors.

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Reimagining our world: an economic system that includes everyone
Trickle-down economics or tricked by economics? In his latest book,
Arunjay argues that capitalism isn’t working and we need to
proactively shift our consciousness if we’re going to reimagine
a better world that tackles the ultimate challenge: inclusion.
The Power Of Micro Money Transfers
Arunjay uses his deep knowledge of the international finance and
micro-payments industry to blow apart the disadvantage for poor
households who rely on small, cross-border payments. In this
groundbreaking book, he sets out a blueprint for the money
transfer industry to become more transparent and fair to those
who most need it.
Reimagining our world: an economic system that includes everyone
Trickle-down economics or tricked by economics? In his latest book,
Arunjay argues that capitalism isn’t working and we need to
proactively shift our consciousness if we’re going to reimagine
a better world that tackles the ultimate challenge: inclusion.

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